Tag Archives: TV

S01E08 – Marc Fennell, Broadcaster

Marc Fennell & Peter Scobie

Episode 8 includes an interview with Marc Fennell, broadcaster extraordinaire. We discuss;

  • Live Journal – yeah remember that?
  • Why radio networks understand social networking better than TV networks
  • How podcasting has kept Radio National going
  • Why Google Glass is doomed
  • Why Apple will lead the wearable tech revolution
  • The secret to Apple Watch’s imminent success
  • Why Samsung struggles to launch products
  • The best advice Andrew Denton gave Marc
  • A synopsis of Marc’s new book – The Planet According To Film

Plus I talk about a slick new interactive commercial from Honda called The Other Side.

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S01E07 – Sean Callanan, Sports Geek

Peter Scobie and Sean Callanan

Episode 7 includes an interview with Sean Callanan from Sports Geek who takes us through;

  • His digital breakfast,
  • Dog fooding,
  • How digital has transformed sports storytelling,
  • The story of Shaq joining Twitter,
  • The current social networks battle for the sports fan,
  • New social network Ello,
  • The impact of mobile and video for sports,
  • TV and social platforms,
  • The ROI of social media marketing for sporting clubs,
  • How Apple Pay and NFC might change the sporting landscape,
  • The advice of following your interest (over your passion)

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Why The Slap Producers have got it wrong

The producers of the Australian TV drama, The Slap, have taken on a Netherlands torrent site and won. The site was used by about 40,000 citizens of Australia and New Zealand to “share content that was not commercially available for viewing in other countries”. Now, Australians overseas will need to either wait for the DVD to come out in their respective country or find another torrent site to go to.

The ABC geo-blocks iView content so that overseas audiences can’t view. The rationale is that if audiences can download content online, for free, then they won’t bother buying the DVD. The only problem is that TV viewers around the world are fragmenting into the downloaders and the DVD buyers. People who download, don’t buy DVDs and people who buy DVDs, don’t download.

Australian producers need to adjust their business model accordingly. Why isn’t The Slap available on iTunes or an online ABC Shop? Not months after the buzz has subsided but the night after the Australian broadcast. Would producers not make more money via online channels than with DVD sales? TV is evolving and the beauty of iTunes is that you can realease episodes one by one and not have to wait for the season to finish before distributing it on DVD.

What lessons can be learned from the music industry’s struggle with piracy? Is it really illegal to download a show via a torrent in the UK if the show is available, for free, to watch anytime, on iView in Australia?
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Mobile multitasking and the future of TV

Guy with mobile in bed

Mashable recently reported on the increase of people multitasking with their mobile devices. My iPhone addiction combined with my Gen Y short attention span has resulted in me constantly multitasking. Weather, news, social feeds and email are all updated and checked several times throughout the day.

In a recent Yahoo and Razorfish poll of 2,000 Yanks, 94% engaged in some form of mobile communication while watching TV. Reality, News, Comedy and Sport are the most attractive to multitaskers with ad time becoming their mobile prime time. Mobile traffic also spikes during breaks in sporting events; Yahoo Sports saw a 305% increase during the last Super Bowl halftime show.

Bottom line: TV Advertising is stuffed.

Result: TV channels (not content) will die.

Musings: Here are some of my crystal ball predictions on how things might change:

Behaviour:

  • Multitasking whilst watching the box is more strenuous so people will watch less TV and go to bed earlier.
  • The mobile will become the new remote control. Viewers will turn to their mobile instead of changing the channel.
  • People won’t enjoy watching TV channels as much as they aren’t as engaged.
TV Production
  • TV networks will be forced to interact with viewers. Hashtags are just the beginning – there will be more polls, more ‘let the audience decide’. Choose your own adventure won’t just be the books you read in the primary school library, it will be its own TV subgenre.
  • TV channels will focus more on live entertainment – more live sport, variety shows and live dramas (essentially – theatre) – everything will need to be live to give TV a unique selling point.
  • Content will become shorter. That means The 7.30 report will end at 7.45 and True Blood will go for 27.5 minutes.
  • Sports broadcasting will be supported by mobile experiences where viewers can view game related content and information. Watch the entire game from seat FF 66 in the Great Northern Stand on your iPad.

TV Advertising

  • TV Ads will need to try harder to get our attention.
  • To engage TV Ads will need to incentivise and engage viewing. Live competitions, more yelling of the words FREE, BOGOF, SEX and SALE (not in that order), Google + hangout broadcasts….hmmm.. TV advertising will struggle.
  • More branded content. Red Bull won’t just sponsor teenagers with mullets who ride motorbikes.
  • Mobile User Experience (MUX) will be the next boom for smart digital gurus.
What do you think? Do you find yourself on your phone during intense and complex dramas like Damages and Dexter? Does the mobile detract or enhance TV viewing? Are any of these predictions going to come true?
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